News

CRACKING CHRISTMAS LUNCH

Approximately 100 people attended our annual Christmas lunch on Thursday 19th December. The event included a variety of stalls selling products pupils had made in their technical and junior classes. There was also a musical presentation by pupils before the traditional Christmas meal.

Did you attend our Christmas lunch? We are currently seeking feedback to ensure this year’s event will be even better. If you were there – and have any good ideas for next year – please email us at admin@falklandhouseschool.org with your suggestions.

FHS TEAM GROWS AS NEW STAFF RECRUITED

Due to the success of the recent development of our 52 week provision, we have been advertising a number of care staff vacancies to augment our care staff group. We are pleased to announce that following our return from the Christmas holidays the school has appointed an extra 5 members of staff to the care team.

The staff have completed the School’s comprehensive induction programme and are now finding their feet in the various units. Everyone in the school community wishes them the best of luck.

YOUTH ISSUES FORUM VISITS FHS

Prior to attending FHS, many of our pupils exhibited very challenging behaviour. For adolescents and younger boys this is frequently rooted in feelings of anxiety, anger and frustration. These feelings all-to-often erupt as violence – directed particularly towards family members and female caregivers.

When FHS receives a new pupil we always act to stem this kind of behaviour. Through a whole school approach, pupils are encouraged to examine how they behave towards others and to reflect on how violence has affected them and their families. One aspect of this approach has been to reach out to the community through Fife’s Youth Issues Forum.

The Forum, which meets every three months, was set up to enable independent residential schools, Young Person’s Units and other childcare organisations in Fife to share examples of best practice and to raise concerns. FHS has been a member of the Forum since it was convened by Fife Police two years ago.

Two of the Forum’s co-ordinators were recently invited to visit the School to meet with pupils over lunch. Three small group sessions with the co-ordinators, pupils and staff helped pupils understand the impact that all verbally and physically challenging behaviour has on emotional well-being. Pupils were also taught that violence towards other individuals can be a serious criminal offence.

At the point of being referred to FHS, many families are at breaking point because of their child’s behaviour. However, once they are enrolled and settled at the school any aggressive behaviour quickly reduces and, in the vast majority of cases, disappears altogether.

PUPILS MAP OUT CAREER WITH SDS CLASSES

As part of Falkland House’s Throughcare Transition Planning, 4th, 5th and 6th year pupils are to receive innovative careers advice classes. The programme, which will run over several weeks, is being delivered by Skills Development Scotland (SDS) careers advisor Jim Thomson.

The classes will revolve around SDS’s My World of Work – a comprehensive, interactive tool which will challenge the boys to examine their strengths, skills and interests within both a work and education context.

The various activities within the programme are designed to help the boys develop specific skills and identify a further education or future career path. Practical steps, like C.V. writing and interview technique, will also be covered.

Further information on My World of Work is available at: www.myworldofwork.co.uk/

SKIING TO SUCCESS

Pupils from class 4/5 have been entered for the SQA’s Personal Development Award for the first time. The Award, which is split into four units, encourages the pupils to consider their strengths, weaknesses, hopes and aspirations for the future.

The boys will fulfil two of the Award’s units with another first time activity for the school – skiing.

At the end of March the boys will embark on a residential ski trip to Glenshee. Staying in Blackwater Outdoor Centre, they will experience Scottish mountains first hand and develop the skills necessary to negotiate a variety of ski slopes.

Although skiing will no doubt be an exciting experience, making the trip happen will be the most important part for the boys.

As part of their Personal Development Award, all pupils will be supported through an evaluation before being allocated tasks to complete during the trip.

Together, the boys will be responsible for all aspects of the planning and implementation of the excursion: organising budgets, booking lift passes and equipment, creating menus, shopping for supplies, cooking and cleaning-up… and more!

These activities will provide the boys with a wonderful opportunity to develop their communication, numeracy and interpersonal skills, both to support personal relationships and increase employability. At the same time, the trip also links many Experiences and Outcomes within the Health and Wellbeing Curriculum.

FHS RECEIVES UN AWARD

FHS receives United Nations award, becoming one of the first independent schools in Scotland to achieve the accolade.

The Rights Respecting Schools Award (RRSA) recognises achievement in putting the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) at the heart of a school’s planning, policies, practice and ethos.

The CRC is a comprehensive human rights treaty that enshrines specific children’s rights in international law. These rights define universal principles and standards for the status and treatment of children worldwide no matter who they are or where they live – to grow up safe, happy and healthy.

Fife school secures UN award


Falkland House School in Fife, which specialises in the education of boys who require additional learning support, has been awarded a top United Nations award and become one of the first independent schools in Scotland to receive the accolade.

The UNICEF UK Rights Respecting School Award (RRSA) is based on principles of equality, dignity, respect, non-discrimination and participation. The RRSA seeks to put the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) at the heart of a school’s ethos and culture to improve well-being and develop every child’s talents and abilities to their full potential.

 

UNICEF is the world’s leading organisation for children, working in over 190 countries and is the largest global organisation working specifically for children and their rights.

The CRC is a comprehensive human rights treaty that enshrines specific children’s rights in international law. These rights define universal principles and standards for the status and treatment of children worldwide no matter who they are or where they live – to grow up safe, happy and healthy.

A rights-respecting school is a community where children’s rights are learned, taught, practised, respected, protected and promoted. Young people and the school community learn about children’s rights by putting them into practice every day. The whole school learns about the CRC as well as empowering children to become active citizens and learners.

 

Children and young people in rights-respecting schools develop a stronger sense of the need to act for global justice.

The award follows on the back of the school being awarded nine Excellents and one Very Good by the Care Inspectorate last month, making Falkland House the highest rated educational establishment of its type across Scotland.

Falkland House School care worker, Maj Yule, who co-ordinated the scheme for the school said:

“I am absolutely delighted that Falkland House School has been awarded this UNICEF accolade, following so quickly on from being judged Excellent by the Care Inspectorate in nine out of ten categories. This UNICEF award is a tribute to the hard work and dedication of the staff here at Falkland House, enshrining the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child at the heart of our ethos and empowering the pupils to be active citizens and learners with a strong sense of the need to act for global justice.”

Falkland House School rated best of its kind in Scotland

Falkland House School is top of the class…. Again!

Falkland House School, which specialises in the education of boys who require additional learning support, has been awarded nine Excellents and one Very Good by the Care Inspectorate. The awarding makes Falkland House the highest rated educational establishment of its type across Scotland.

The School has been judged against ten Quality Statements set out by the Care inspectorate and received Excellent ratings across a number of categories, including for staffing, professionalism and the overall health and the wellbeing of its pupils.

The Care Inspectorate, which is responsible for monitoring care, social work and child protection services in Scotland, most recently made an unannounced visit to the School in June. The report following the inspection cited the “outstanding relationships between the pupils and the school staff” and the “robust quality assurance systems” at the School.

Falkland House School Director, Stuart Jacob, said:

“I am absolutely delighted that Falkland House School has been judged Excellent by the Care Inspectorate in nine out of ten categories. Such a high rating is tribute to the hard work and dedication of all the staff here at Falkland House.

“But the hard work doesn’t stop here. Where I’m sure many organisations would be satisfied with nine out of ten, we are determined to continue to improve and to achieve Excellent status in every category.”

Gillian Taylor, whose son Andrew attends Falkland House School, said:

“I am not surprised Falkland House School has received such an excellent report from the Care Inspectorate. The School considers the needs and potential of each pupil individually, something crucial when educating children with special educational needs.”

Falkland House was also one of the first independent schools in Scotland to be awarded Autism Accreditation by the National Autistic Society and is known for providing special integrated education to boys with Autistic Spectrum Disorders as well as those with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties, ADHD and Tourette’s Syndrome.

Seminar Success!

The latest thinking on dealing with Autism and ADHD in children and young people

An innovative seminar on Autism and ADHD in children and young people last week brought together leading experts, parents and those from the fields of social work, education and health.

The seminar, held at Falkland House School, attracted an audience of 80 people and was chaired by the Herald journalist Stephen Naysmith. Speakers at the event included writer and educational consultant Bill Colley and internationally renowned scientist Dr Alex Richardson, who discussed the effect of nutrition on behaviour, learning and mood in relation to ADHD, dyslexia, depression and schizophrenia.

Gillian Taylor, whose son was diagnosed with ADHD at the age of 5 and currently attends Falkland House School, also spoke about the difficulties she faced when trying to find a school which supported her as well as her child.

Speaking after the event Stuart Jacob, Director of Falkland House School, said;

“I would like to thank everyone who attended the seminar, especially the event’s speakers. I’m delighted that the day proved so popular – I think we could have held three seminars with the level of interest we’ve received.

“The speakers were fantastic and provided real insight into Autism and ADHD, including the causes of these complex conditions and how to deal with the often resultant challenging behaviour.”

“We were thrilled to be able to hold the seminar at Falkland House School and we are now actively looking to organise more events in the future.”

Falkland House School specialises in the education of boys who require additional support. As the first independent school in Scotland to be awarded Autism Accreditation by the National Autistic Society, it provides special integrated education to boys with ASD, as well as those with social, emotional and behavioural difficulties, ADHD and Tourette’s Syndrome.